Turkey trilogy

The former center of the Ottoman Empire isn’t exactly a breeding ground for the bird that Americans associate with Thanksgiving. In fact, the turkey is native to North America, so why do they share the same name?

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First, let’s get the facts on the two turkeys. The word turkey has been used to refer to “land occupied by the Turks” since the 1300s and was even used by Chaucer in The Book of the Duchess. The word Turk is of unknown origin, but it is used in such varying languages as Italian, Arabic, Persian, and many others to refer to people from this region. The land occupied by the Turks was known as the Ottoman Empire from the 1300s until 1922. Following World War I and the fall of the Ottomans, the republic of Turkey was declared, taking on the name that had long referred to that region. The bird is another story. Meleagris gallopavo is an odd-looking bird that is known for its bare head, wattle, and iridescent plumage.

How are they related? First, we have to get to know another bird: the guinea fowl. This bird bears some resemblance to the then-recently found American bird. Though it is native to eastern Africa, the guinea fowl was imported to Europe through the Ottoman Empire and came to be called the turkey-cock or turkey-hen. When settlers in the New World began to send similar-looking fowl back to Europe, they were mistakenly called turkeys.

Every language seems to have radically different names for this bird. The Turkish word is hindi, which literally means “Indian.” The original word in French, coq d’Inde, meant rooster of India, and has since shortened to dinde. These names likely derive from the common misconception that India and the New World were one and the same. In Portugese, it’s literally a “Peru bird,” and in Malay, it’s called a “Dutch chicken.”

The turkey’s acceptance into the Old World happened quickly. By 1575, the English were enjoying the North American bird at Christmas dinner, and Shakespeare talked about it in Henry IV. Turkeys, as we know them, have fared better than their guinea fowl relatives on the international scene, perhaps explaining why you probably have never heard of guinea fowl until right now.


New Cross colours collection

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7/11

It is incompletely refreshing to see an artist showing through so entirely in their video, and also being hands on in that exact video, beyonce totally goes off in New terms of a ‘bring you in the game’ changer for a new artist of her video ‘711’ that push is major.. and that hit for real. It’s not really even a response to that, Beyonce went off and in! I’d say that buzzin is workin~

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